thomas paine

“I love the man that can smile in trouble, that can gather strength from distress, and grow brave by reflection. ‘Tis the business of little minds to shrink; but he whose heart is firm, and whose conscience approves his conduct, will pursue his principles unto death.”
– Thomas Paine, The Crisis, No. 1, 1776

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In the Dynamic of Discretion, we identified the Five Types of Offenders. In this series on the Dynamic of Compliance, we look at how to overcome challenges to lawful authority by answering some basic questions.

The fundamental goal of law enforcement is to generate voluntary compliance with the law. Each of the Five Types of Offenders will respond to your authority slightly differently depending on how you answer a basic set of questions. Even if they don’t vocalize it, they are likely asking it.

The late Dr. George Thompson, founder of Verbal Judo, was instrumental in helping me formulate this Dynamic. Many thanks go to him for his influence on me, Police Dynamics, and law enforcement officers throughout the world.

Simple Offenders need an Education. They want to know the answer to the question “What?” as in “What do you want me to do?” They are generally not much of a challenge to law enforcement because they will typically comply if you simply tell them what you want them to do and then ask them to do it.

Silly Offenders are more of a challenge. They will rarely comply on the first request. They need an Explanation. They want to know “Why?” “Why should I have to comply?” “Why do I have to listen to you?” This is where many police officers and corrections officials make a crucial mistake. They answer something like, “Because I said so, that’s why!” And they just blew it! They turned a routine challenge to authority into an ego battle, and they may very well have to resort to physical force before it’s all over. That response doesn’t even work well at home! Do you expect it to work well on the streets?

The professional law officer has learned to put his ego aside and appeal to a higher authority. In other words, it has nothing to do with what I say. It has to do with what the law says, or what the policy says. By setting your ego aside, appealing to a higher authority, and answering the question “Why?” effectively, I believe you can generate voluntary compliance with the vast majority of individuals you deal with. In the next session, we will examine the Sensual Offender and learn how to answer the question, “What’s in it for me…?”

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At over 5000 years old, the ancient pyramids in Giza are among the oldest structures in the world. They provided a great opportunity to talk about the importance of building structure in our lives.

The 4-sided pyramid is a good model to illustrate the power of structure. Imagine that each face (triangle) represents an important aspect of your overall strength and structure. One triangle represents the three aspects of your Integrity - character, competence, and communication. Another represents the importance of exercise – strength, flexibility, and aerobic conditioning. Another, the three components of nutritional health – balanced diet, hydration, and anti-oxidants. The fourth, Stress Management – sleep, rest, and recreation.

Balancing all four aspects of your life and building structure in these areas brings strength, integrity, and wellness.

In this second video from Giza, I use the Twin Towers of Integrity as a model to illustrate the relationship between character and competence.

Both character and competence (or as Noah Webster calls them, virtues and abilities) are critical for success and together they form the pillars that support our integrity. Our integrity, in turn, builds trust, which fuels relationships internally and externally. Trust-based relationships with the community are the foundation of the coactive response to crime-fighting.

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Our English word “integrity” comes from the Latin root “integritas” - meaning wholeness and completeness. We also get our English words integrated and integer from this same root. When I visited the ancient Roman city of Jerash near Amman, Jordan, I had the chance to tell another centurion story relating to integrity.

In the Roman military tradition, the soldiers would line up for inspection and as the centurion approached each man, the soldier would bang his breastplate with his fist and shout, “Integritas!” which meant, “I am whole. I am complete. And I am prepared for battle…!”

I was first exposed to this history in a speech by General Charles Krulak, then commandant of the US Marine Corps.

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The Peter Principle I am referring to here is not the one you may have read about in leadership literature. The one I am talking about references the Apostle Peter, one of the original twelve disciples of Jesus who lived at Capernaum and was a fisherman on the Sea of Galilee.

After feasting on some St. Peter’s fish at a nearby restaurant, I took the opportunity of our visit to the Sea of Galilee to bring you three important leadership principles: The Jethro Principle, The Solomon Principle, and The Peter Principle. Giving credit to Barney Barnes, my Chief of Staff at the Sheriff’s Office (every Sheriff needs a Barney) who first taught me these principles…

Chief Barnes has written an excellent book called Born to Be a Warrior. You can learn more at his website: http://borntobeawarrior.org.

The other Peter Principle is attributed to Dr. Laurence Peter and states:

 ”In a hierarchy every employee tends to rise to his level of incompetence.”

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noah webster“The virtues of men are of more consequence to society than their abilities; and for this reason, the heart should be cultivated with more assiduity than the head.”
– Noah Webster, On the Education of Youth in America, 1788

Another way of saying that character is more important than competence


I was recently discussing with a viewer of the Police Dynamics website about incorporating character-based principles into tactical debriefings. Here is a series of short videos that demonstrate how to make the “character connection” in tactical debriefings, roll call training, and in-service training sessions. The first is a re-enactment of a canine-tracking exercise, followed by a roll call session featuring Lt. “Poncho” Villa, and then a couple of character recognitions with Dorchester County Sheriff’s Office personnel.

(Sadly, Michael Deese, the deputy on the front row/right side, was killed, along with his canine partner, in a tragic car crash some time after this video was filmed …)

There are essentially three keys to building a Culture of Character within any organization:

Develop a new Character Vocabulary
Make the Character Connection
Prepare for the Character Test 

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thomas paine“Society in every state is a blessing, but government, even in its best state, is but a necessary evil; in its worst state an intolerable one; for when we suffer or are exposed to the same miseries by a government, which we might expect in a country without government, our calamity is heightened by reflecting that we furnish the means by which we suffer.” 

– Thomas Paine, Common Sense, 1776

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In these two videos, one from the city of Beth Shaen in Israel and the other from Jerash in Jordan, I use the setting of these ancient cities to emphasize the importance of character in determining a man or a woman of integrity.

The first video from our visit to Beth Shean explains the importance of individual character qualities in defining a man or woman of integrity.

The second video was filmed at the ancient city of Jerash in Amman, Jordan. At the foot of the Temple of Zeus I found a great setting to explain the Twin Towers of Integrity

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(more…)


George Washington

George Washington

“[T]here exists in the economy and course of nature, an indissoluble union between virtue and happiness; between duty and advantage; between the genuine maxims of an honest and magnanimous policy, and the solid rewards of public prosperity and felicity.”
– George Washington, First Inaugural Address, 1789

 

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Sheriff Ray Nash

Sheriff Ray Nash

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The Benefits of Good Character
49 Character Qualities
10 Virtues of a Law Officer
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What Law Enforcement and Community Leaders Are Saying About Police Dynamics

“A few years ago, we brought the Police Dynamics program to the Cincinnati Police Division and were most impressed with the quality of the training and richness of the program.”
Mike Daly
Character Council of Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky

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Sheriff Larry Williams
Orangeburg, SC

"I cannot tell you how excited I am to see this website. I was introduced to your video on the Dynamics of Authority through my father who is a police chaplain for the FBI and local law enforcement agencies here in Las Cruces. I have taught and applied the Dynamics model to my students when I was a teacher, and now to my department as a fire fighter."
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Undersheriff
Grand County Sheriff’s Office

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Sheriff
Cleveland County, OK
former 2nd VP - National Sheriff's Association

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Sheriff
Delores County, CO
former Pres - County Sheriff's of Colorado

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Tom McClain
Chief of Police
Willard, MO

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John Whetsel
Sheriff
Oklahoma County, OK

"If you believe that good character is an essential element in policing, you will want to send your key staff to Police Dynamics."
David Williams
Sheriff
Tarrant County, TX

"In the three years prior to our character initiative, we had 42 labor and employee grievances, and seven different lawsuits. In the three years since we put the character initiative in place, we have had two grievances and no lawsuits from employees. I think that, in and of itself, is significant."
Rodney Ray
City Manager
Owasso, OK

"This course was one of the best training sessions that I’ve been through. This concept will benefit me and the staff in my division."
Police Dynamics participant

[We have] more awareness of the preventative benefits of a character initiative as opposed to the typical reactive approach to situations. There is a sense of excitement by organization leaders as they begin to see a change in their culture. Bob Powell
Character Council
Fort Collins, CO

"[The Police Dynamics training] brings us closer together, more like a family … it reminds us of why we’re out there and what it’s about.”
Captain John Decker
Dorchester County Sheriff's Office, SC

"This class gave me the vocabulary that I have been looking for to praise and motivate my employees."
Police Dynamics participant

"We’ve built a much better relationship with each other. We’ve seen a decrease in complaints. We’ve become a family instead of a place to work."
Sheriff Howie Godwin
Highlands County, FL

“This shows us a new approach to recognize employees’ character traits - and to acknowledge them for those good traits versus, 'You did an excellent job…' It’s some fresh ideas in an area that we probably all need to change."
Major P.D. Taylor
Oklahoma County Sheriff's Office

"The Police Dynamics training that Ray Nash brought teaches the things that are at the core of being a good police officer – being trustworthy, being of good character…"
Sgt. Julie Shearer
Cincinnati Police Div.

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Chaplain Carl Nelson
Colorado Springs Police Department

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Former Judge
Burleson, TX

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Teofil Parasca
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Arad County Police
Romania

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Chief Lynn Williams
Chickasha, OK

“We need to return to our basic character traits that made this country great. Ray Nash has the program to do it."
Police Dynamics participant

"This shows us a new approach to recognize those employees’ character traits and to recognize and acknowledge them for those good traits versus, “You did an excellent job…” It’s some fresh ideas in an area that we probably all need to change."
Major P.D. Taylor
Oklahoma County Sheriff's Office

"In the three years prior to our character initiative, we had 42 labor and employee grievances, and seven different lawsuits. In the three years since we put the character initiative in place, we have had two grievances and no lawsuits from employees. I think that, in and of itself, is significant."
Rodney Ray
City Manager
Owasso, OK

"Absolutely fantastic! It reminded me of why I wanted to be a peace officer."
Police Dynamics participant

"the finest value-added training anywhere."
Sheriff David Williams
Tarrant County, TX

"We continue to benefit from your teaching and hire with a strong emphasis on character."
Chief Tom McClain
Willard, MO

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Glen P. Trainor
Undersheriff
Grand County, CO

"Sheriff Ray Nash is an internationally recognized speaker that you and your staff will learn powerful principles from, while enjoying the lesson."
DeWayne Beggs
Sheriff
Cleveland County, OK

"Very comprehensive, a great resource manual for the future. The seminar was dynamic in every way. What a great resource for people throughout their day-to-day routines.”
Doug Carter
Trooper
Indiana State Police